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Bouillon Weekly

Dear readers,

Over the past week Egypt has dipped into further chaos than that which erupted late month at the anniversary of the inauguration of Muslim Brotherhood leader and Egypt’s first democratically elected president Mohammed Morsi.

After being given a 48 hours ultimatum to step down, Morsi was ousted by the military – under the guidance of army chief and newly proclaimed hero Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. Coup or not, the increasing human impact is worrying: while Morsi, MB officials and many journalists sit behind bars, violent clashes between pro and anti-Morsi groups cause the death toll to continue to rise.

Adly Mansour, the head of Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court, has been named as interim president, but no elections are scheduled as of yet. Until a new president is chosen, the Egyptian Constitution is suspended and many broadcasting channels are shut down.

International actors remain cautious when reacting to last week’s events in Egypt. Obama has been careful not to name the ousting of Morsi a military coup. Nonetheless, the US Senate is to review on Wednesday the $1.3 billion in military aid and $250 million in economic aid the US government sends to Cairo each year. The African Union has taken a firmer stance: the AU’s Peace and Security Council called Morsi’s forced departure an “unconstitutional change of government”, and Egypt has been suspended from the AU. It still remains unclear whether in this state of great instability, heavily-indebted Egypt will salvage its economy and pursue its difficult journey on the path of democracy.

lac megantic

More locally, in the aftermath of the deadly explosion of a train carrying crude oil on Saturday at Lac-Mégantic (a town of 6,000 residents roughly three hours away from Montreal), five are confirmed dead and forty remain missing. Potable water is at a low, and the extent of the damage as well as the cause of the derailment of the train remain unknown. This week, our thoughts are with the citizens of Lac-Mégantic –  the survivors, the lost, and those who remain missing.

At home, Montreal’s mayoral scene remains a constant source of local newspaper fodder as cases of corruption continue to pile up. More than one ex-mayor might be facing charges, and citizens in the city are fed up with empty promises and continual dishonesty from local politicians. With municipal elections coming up in November one can’t help but wonder who will take the reins. Read 3 novembre 2013: à qui la mairie de Montréal? by Hugo Guerche for insight.

Drone technology has become ever more important in recent wars, and will have an unprecedented impact on the warfare of the future. This being said, drones have a decidedly checkered approval rating. Daan Rozenbroek however, falls squarely on the approval side of the debate, read Condone the Drone and weigh-in in comments section.

France’s restrictive immigration policy has long been a topic of international discussion and debate, but should they perhaps be more concerned with citizens leaving than immigrants entering? France’s rising emigration rate, stale economy and general malaise doesn’t bode well. Read La France, port d’émigration by  Nicolas Ternisien.

 

That’s all for now readers,

 

Meagan Potier

Editor-in-Chief

 

Featured photo: AttributionNoncommercialShare Alikeby lokha, Creative Commons, Flickr

About meagan.potier

Student of World Religions and Political Science at McGill University. Meagan joined The Political Bouillon last year in hopes of being able to keep writing and editing, as well as foster her interests in international politics. As Managing Editor. Through her position she helps the Bouillon evolve into stronger and more comprehensive publication that embodies the myriad of opinions and perspectives it represents.

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One comment

  1. Great comments on Egypt.

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